LucasArts’ Star Wars: Battlefront II is a game that resonates deeply in the hearts of not only gamers but Star Wars fans. If you played the game, you got to experience the Star Wars universe through many perspectives, travel and fight on the may maps, and understand the chaos of war in Star Wars whether it was a massive space battle or massive ground fight. In a child’s eyes, it expanded our knowledge of Star Wars and brought more light to how fighting happened and the lore of the franchise.

We waited anxiously for Battlefront III, the Star Wars we never got—cancelled by the evil corporation known as Disney who also canceled Star Wars: The Clone Wars and rendered Star Wars lore, not made by Disney, invalid from the strings they’re pulling. I could seriously write a case study on the travesties of Disney. But, then who came to save the day in 2015? EA DICE with Star Wars Battlefront.

(Quick rant: What is DICE’s problem with naming things? They went from Battlefield 4 to Battlefield 1, instead of 6 because of Hardline (#5), but because it was World War 1. Then there’s the problem of separating the homogeneous games by… a colon. LucasArts’ Star Wars: Battlefront and Star Wars: Battlefront II is different that DICE’s Star Wars Battlefront. Why didn’t DICE name the game Star Wars (colon) Battlefront III? I shake my head.)

DICE’s Star Wars Battlefront, however, didn’t really feel like the Star Wars we know and love. It looks like Star Wars, plays like Star Wars, and is even more immersive from the graphical fidelity, but lacks the traditional LucasArts Battlefront vibe. In my personal opinion, it feels more like DICE’s most popular franchise Battlefield—like a reskin, just like Battlefield 1; it doesn’t feel like a World War 1 shooter, just a Battlefield 4 reskin.

There were more problems with the “new” Battlefront—incomplete as it was. Back then, we could have ragged on them for releasing the game with (as compared to LucasArts’ Star Wars: Battlefront II) missing game modes, maps, classes, but most importantly, did not have a campaign. Now, DICE has sort of redeemed themselves, as it’s the opposite with many maps, and modes (that should have been there to begin with). The thing that sucks though, and this was a cash grab strategy, was the release of maps through optional purchasable downloadable content has split the community. And a lot of games do this.

Basically, this means that everyone starts off with a certain number of maps in the game by default. Then there is DLC you can buy which have extra, sometimes better maps. People buy those and migrate over, while people who don’t buy the DLC don’t have access. Now the community is divided.

With DICEs’ confirmation of Star Wars Battlefront II (the colon really makes a difference here), I have hope, as the biggest news is a single \-player campaign will be added.

EA’s CEO, Andrew Wilson claimed, “Our next Star Wars Battlefront will be even bigger, taking players into more locations, and allowing them to play with more heroes and characters across multiple Star Wars eras. There will be new ways to play, including an all-new single-player campaign, and much, much more that we are excited to share with our players in the months ahead.”

I really wished they saved the Rogue One transitional Era for this next game instead of dumping into Battlefront as a DLC, but otherwise, I’m excited to see what DICE can do for us Star Wars fans. Many can agree, as gamers, DICE’s Battlefront was a “meh” but as a Star Wars fan, it was a slight disappointment, all compared to LucasArts’ Star Wars: Battlefront II. DICE’s Battlefront seems like a test, so I hope they can pull off a Titanfall 2, like Respawn Entertainment did, learning from their past mistakes, listening to the community, and coming back strong.

 

 

Written by Nifa Kaniga

Entertainment Editor