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Jayci Goldsmith holding one of her many tennis awards.
Ranked 28th in the state, and with college offers from Alabama State, A&M College Station, and many others, Dripping Springs junior Jayci Goldsmith is seeing her dreams come true on the court.

Back during the Winter Break, Goldsmith competed in the USTA National Winter Championships for singles and doubles in Phoenix, Arizona.

“I got to the quarterfinals in singles. I lost in three sets. It was a really close match.  Then in doubles, I got third place, so I got a bronze ball with my partner from New York,”  Goldsmith said.

This wasn’t some silly tournament, as most kids were competing for the attention of colleges, which meant their futures were on the lines.

“Everyone is very intense. At nationals people are traveling from all over the U.S. so everyone’s parents are strict on them too, and coaches come with.  Especially on the court, then off the court you can talk to some friends, but some people don’t talk to anyone because they’re focused,” Goldsmith said.

Of course Goldsmith wasn’t sweating it when it came to possible colleges. They came to her.  And she proved her standings, making it known that she was supposed to be there.

“My favorite moment was my win against this girl who’s top in the nation named Reilly Tran and that was one that Alabama, Texas Tech, TCU, A&M, OU, a bunch of college coaches were watching me, and I played very well,” Goldsmith said.

Her position is open next year, as she will be a senior at Dripping Springs, with college right around the corner.

“I’m not quite sure if I’m going to play it next year because I’m planning on committing to a college soon, so I won’t have to play it,” Goldsmith said.

College coaches have already latched onto Goldsmith, providing her with many options.

“Right now I am deciding between Alabama and A&M. They both have offered me [a] full ride.  I’m visiting Alabama this weekend actually,” Goldsmith said.

Tennis is the reason Goldsmith is where she is right now, and she hasn’t gone a day without it since starting.

“I like it because it’s an individual sport. I tried it when I was nine years old  and I ended up loving it,” Goldsmith said.

As the competition gets tougher, Goldsmith is a young woman who has no plans of backing down.  

“If it’s something you love, just keep working hard and never give up,” Goldsmith said.

 

Giselle Galletti

Staff Writer