Kylie Jenner’s 4728 (and counting) Instagram posts display a glamorous lifestyle of perfect makeup, flawless hair, and curvy bodies that are supposedly 100% real. But just because a picture says #NoFilter, doesn’t mean it’s real and achievable by the everyday girl.

 In this day and age, kids are practically being raised by technology- you can’t watch TV without seeing a commercial about ABC Mouse, a learning program for young kids. Children are using handheld devices at the age of 8, and are immediately released into the world wide web, which is filled with fake hair, high heels, and overlined lips.

 Scientists say that children and early teens are at the best age to learn things like how to play the guitar or how to sew because they are at a very impressionable time in their lives. This is exactly the same time that these same kids are being exposed to things like Instagram and Twitter.

 Young girls especially are in danger of losing all self esteem. Billboards scattered around the country display beautiful models photoshopped to look like goddesses telling little girls to be themselves and be comfortable in their own bodies. However, these girls are growing up wondering why they don’t have beautiful long hair like Gigi Hadid, luscious thick eyebrows like Cara Delevingne, or a “hot bod” like Hailey Baldwin.

 This is not to say that the internet is a bad thing. Nowadays, children are sometimes even more educated than adults thanks to the endless information the Net can supply. Kids are even more up to date on what’s happening in the election or who’s going to win the Nobel Peace prize because all the knowledge is right in front of them at all times.

 Be that as it may, the influence that the celebrities have on young children could be seen as bad. No amount of filters or flattering lighting will ever make girls feel as amazing as the models on the billboards look because most of it is fake. It is not humanly possible to have perfect skin and a flat tummy every day without the help of an outside force.

On the other hand, in recent months, familiar celebrity faces have been standing out to say “Hey, we’re just like you, we’re not perfect. And it’s okay.” Zendaya, a singer and Disney Channel star went so far as to post a before and after picture of her being photoshopped. She explained how much she loved her own body and didn’t want others to think she looked like that.

“These are the things that make women self conscious,” she said. “That creates the unrealistic ideals of beauty that we have.”

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