“Wish we could turn back time/ To the good ‘ole days/ When our mamas sang/ Us to sleep but now we’re/ Stressed Out,” sings a budding band in their hit song, “Stressed Out”. Twenty One Pilots, a band quickly climbing the totem pole of popular culture, is surrounding the minds of teenagers with lyrics and passion. “My friends kept telling me to check them out, and when I did, I fell in love with them,” sophomore Varun Verma said. The “them” being referred to is the hit band, Twenty One Pilots. Twenty One Pilots has a large fan base that is spread throughout the world, and if there is one commonality between them, it’s that they are all die-hard about the music.

“Down in the forest/ We’ll sing a chorus/ One that everybody knows,” sings the group on their album Regional at Best in 2011. Although it has taken this long, they most definitely have teens uniting together over their music and lyrics. “I like them because they sound different,” said Olivia Caldera, “You could have a completely different music style than I have because Twenty One Pilots kind of blends genres.” They band covers topics, but are still excited and happy to be there. Twenty One Pilots has a unique way of making people feel at peace, and the performers themselves are always excited to help. “Their songs sound like a celebration in concert,” said sophomore Vasi Bjeletich, “I think that they said a bunch of the things that a bunch of us feel. A lot of songs are love songs, and those are nice, but they’re not super relatable. With Twenty One Pilots songs, you can feel them.”

“These lyrics aren’t for everyone, only few understand,” sings Twenty One Pilots on their album Blurryface released in 2015. It’s really cool to have music that says our thoughts and feelings out loud and that writes our feelings down. Of their songs, Holding Onto You, seems to be a common favorite. In particular, the stanza “You think twice about your life/ It probably happens at night, right?/ Fight it, take the pain ignite it/ Tie a noose around your mind loose enough to breathe fine/ And tie it to a tree and tell it/ You belong to me this ain’t a noose/ This is a leash and I have news for you/ You must obey me,” is attractive to teens. This stanza gives teens hope and allows them to know that there are ways to fight back against their struggles. The lyrics contained in the artwork that is Twenty One Pilots music often contain messages that speak to people on a deep emotional level. “I think it kind of amplifies what I’m already feeling,” said Bjeletich.

“Something we can relate to/ All of us relate/ If it’s something we’ve been through,” the band sings on Regional at Best. Some of their songs are generic, not that they don’t have any meaning, but that everyone can relate to, like Stressed Out. Everyone can relate to stress, but not everyone can relate to topics in Trees or stuff like that. One of the goals of any musician is to create meaningful, relatable music, and Twenty One Pilots has been successfully achieving this for the last five years.

The only issue is that to some, their music is becoming too relatable, stealing away its value to original clique members. I get really mad when people are fake clique members because it’s like “Yeah, their music is cool, but do you understand the lyrics? Do you know what people have gone through?” Because of what many of Twenty One Pilots do experience, it is a very reasonable feeling to be angry at people who do not understand.

“I know/ Where you stand/ Silent/ In the trees,” sings the band on their albums Regional at Best and Vessel. To be blunt, teenagers experience emotions and go through periods of depression and other things that can leave them feeling hopeless, and Twenty One Pilots save them from those feelings or help them through it.

“I will fly with no hope, no fear,” sings the band in their final song of their self-titled album, Twenty One Pilots. Twenty One Pilots provides emotional relief to teenagers and truly all people who experience any kind of powerful emotion. As Varun Verma said, “They’re a great band and anyone who’s interested should definitely try to listen to them.”

 

Written by Emily Curran

Staff Writer