In Sully, Tom Hanks portrays Captain Chesley Sullenberger’s miraculous landing of U.S Airways flight 1549 on the Hudson river with 155 souls on board. For the total of 208 seconds the plane was in the air, it was immediately hit by birds and shortly afterwards, the flight experienced dual engine loss. Sully, along with his first officer, Jeff Skiles (Aaron Eckhart), realized after approximately 35 seconds of analyzing the situation, landing at either LaGuardia or Teterboro airport would be impossible. Therefore, Sully made the unbelievable decision to perform an emergency landing on the Hudson river.
The movie, directed by Clint Eastwood (American Sniper, Unforgiven) provides the viewer with not only Sully’s point of view, but the point of view of everybody who was involved; that is what I especially liked about Sully. This concept was nothing less than brilliant. As the viewer, we are able to see the perspective of First Officer Skiles, the air traffic controllers, the passengers, the flight attendants, the NYPD scuba diving team, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), and Sully’s wife. The different angles of all the characters help contribute to how incredible and unbelievable this event truly was.

The star of Sully, Tom Hanks, is once again effortlessly impeccable in his acting. From Hanks’s calm and collected  reenactment of Sully’s decision to land the plane in the Hudson to his precise mimicking of Sullenberger’s real-life mannerisms, Hanks’s acting could not have been better. As far as Tom Hanks’s role as Captain Sullenberger having any acknowledgment by the Academy Awards, it is definitely possible he might be nominated. However, I am almost certain that he would not win the Academy Award for Best Actor. I say this simply because the past two winners (Leonardo DiCaprio and Eddie Redmayne) portrayed such exceptional, rigorous, and unique characters that I cannot compare the character of Captain Sullenberger to either of them.

The screenplay and nonlinear timeline of the movie is extremely clever due to the fact the events were not in a generic, chronological order as I expected it to be. Instead, the movie began after the Hudson water landing already happened. Then, we see the harsh investigation take place by the NTSB. Yet, what I enjoyed most about this factor is that we saw the plane land on the Hudson 3-4 different times to see the different angles of all the characters, as I mentioned earlier.

Overall, I really enjoyed watching this movie. Yet, I do not expect the movie to win any Academy Awards; but I can foresee it being nominated for several categories. Nevertheless, all the puzzle pieces of acting, directing, and screenplay fit harmoniously to make Sully an accurate, incredible, jaw-dropping representation of the man who really did land U.S Airways flight 1549 in the Hudson river.

 

 

Written by Alyssa Weinstein

Staff Writer